Jobenomics

Goal: Creating 20 Million Jobs By 2020

Jobenomics - Goal: Creating 20 Million Jobs By 2020

Minority-Owned Businesses

Download PDF Version: Minority-Owned Businesses – 10 Jan 2014

Minority-Owned Businesses

www.Jobenomics.com

By: Chuck Vollmer

10 January 2014

Executive Summary.   Today, there are 6 million minority-owned businesses in the US.  Jobenomics advocates a national goal of 18 million by year 2020—a goal that is achievable and necessary.  Race and ethnicity are important elements of America’s economic equation.  Jobenomics forecasts that income opportunity (see Income Inequality versus Opportunity posting) will become a leading domestic issue as minorities assert their growing demographic, economic and political power.    Racial and ethnic minorities currently constitute 40.8% of the US population, and are responsible for approximately $3 trillion worth of America’s expenditures and consumption for goods and services (see Consumption-Based Economy posting).   This degree of economic power could fuel the creation of millions of minority-owned businesses that would provide income opportunity for millions of Americans.

US Demographic Trends

US Minority Demographic Trends.  Today, minorities comprise about 41% of the US population, but will be in the majority much sooner than most people recognize.   According to the US Census Bureau[1], for the first time in American history, most (50.4%) American children younger than age 1 are now racial and ethnic minorities.  Consequently, America could be a generation away from being a minority-majority nation—perhaps quicker, considering aging baby-boomers and low birth rates in the White-majority.   California (60.3% minorities), Texas (55.2%), New Mexico (59.8%) and Hawaii (77.1%) are already minority-majority states.

 US Demographic Profile

According to 2010 Census data[2], the largest minority group is Hispanics and Latinos (Hispanic) with 50.5 million people, followed by African-Americans (Black) with 38.9 million, Asian-Americans (Asian) with 14.7 million, American and Alaskan Natives with 2.9 million, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders with 0.5 million, and “Some Other Race” with 19.1 million.  An additional 9 million Americans identified themselves as multi-racial from two or more races.  196.8 million Americans identified themselves as non-Hispanic Whites (White)—a 59.2% majority compared to a minority population of 40.8%.

Between 2000 and 2010, the White population grew by 2.3 million or 1.2%.   Asians and Hispanics were the fastest-growing groups by percentage, or 43.3% and 43.0% respectively.   The Hispanic population increased by 15.2 million between 2000 and 2010, accounting for half of total US population growth.   Blacks grew at a rate of 12.3% for a total gain of 4.3 million over the decade.  Asians added 4.4 million during this period.  All other minority groups grew by 6.5 million at a combined rate of 26%. 

Minorities in the US Labor Force.   The US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) recently completed a landmark study[3] regarding US labor force characteristics by race and ethnicity[4].  The three major minority groups that the BLS studied were Black, Hispanic and Asian.   The following charts were created by Jobenomics using data from the BLS study to compare these major US minority groups’ employment and income characteristics to those of Whites.  While important, smaller minority groups (American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islanders, and people who identified themselves as multi-racial or from some other race) are not included in this analysis due to limited numbers (only 2.5% of the US labor force).

The US Civilian Labor Force includes all working-age persons who are employed or unemployed and looking for a job.  In 2011, the US civilian labor force was 153.6 million out of a total population of approximately 309 million.   Whites dominated the US labor force with 67% (103.3 million workers) of all workers, followed by Hispanics with 15% (22.9 million), Blacks with 11% (17.1 million) and Asians with 3% (4.7 million).

As shown in the following series of charts, employment in the five major occupational categories is more equally distributed between races/ethnicities than the 67% manpower advantage would imply.

 Median Weekly Earnings By Occupation

As shown above, the five major occupational categories range from management on top, to service on the bottom in terms of median weekly earnings[5].  Based on these five categories, the three major minority groups fared reasonably well against the White majority as indicated in the following charts.

 Occupational Employment of Men

As a percentage of their group, Asian men (49%) were the most likely to be employed in the top category of “management, professional and related occupations” compared to Whites (35%), Blacks (24%) and Hispanics (16%).  In “sales and office occupations” all four groups were relatively equally represented (17%, 18%, 15% and 17%).  “Natural resources, construction and maintenance occupations” were dominated by Hispanics and Whites.  “Production, transportation and material moving occupations” as well as “service occupations” were led by Blacks and Hispanics over Whites and Asians by 22% versus 14% of their respective work forces.

 Occupational Employment of Women

As a percentage of their group, Asian women (44%) were the most likely to be employed in the top category of “management, professional and related occupations” compared to Whites (42%), Blacks (34%) and Hispanics (25%).  In “sales and office occupations” all four groups were relatively equally represented (26%, 31%, 32% and 32%).  Women were not a major contributor by employment in the “Natural resources, construction and maintenance occupations” category.  “Production, transportation and material moving occupations” were relatively equal amongst all women subgroups with Hispanic women having a slight edge.   “Service occupations” were relatively close amongst all women subgroups with Hispanics (31%) followed by Blacks (28%), Asians (22%) and Whites (20%).

It is important to note that these two Occupation Employment charts are calculated as a percentage of their group, as opposed to a percentage of total employed, which, as discussed earlier, is dominated (67%) by Whites.   For example, Asian-male participation in the “management, professional and related occupations” category is better represented by 49% (percentage of their group) than 5.4% (percentage of the total employed) as reported by other BLS surveys[6].   49% reflects that almost half of all working Asian-males are involved in management and professional occupations—an impressive percentage.  5.4% indicates only a small number of Asians are in management and professional occupations compared to the total working population—an unimpressive percentage—that does not account for the fact that the total number of Asians only represents 1/20th of the US work force.  Consequently, major minority groups are faring much better regarding labor force participation than the media and political activists often portray by using percentage of total employed statistics.

Income and Unemployment Inequities.   While Jobenomics asserts that minority groups fare much better in the US labor force than generally perceived, Jobenomics also acknowledges that there are inequities that need to be fixed, especially in the Hispanic and Black subgroups.

 Median US Household Income

According to the most recent US Census Bureau report[7], US median household income has fallen by 9% since 2007, hurting all Americans regardless of race or ethnicity.  Today, the US Asian community maintains the highest median household income of $65,129, followed by Whites ($55,412), Hispanics ($38,624) and Blacks ($32,229).

 Employment-Population Ratio

Over the decades, income inequality has remained relatively the same between the races, collectively increasing during good times, and collectively decreasing over bad times.  During the good times, income inequality was not a politically-charged issue since increasing household income provided a sense of well-being.  Since year 2000, the US Employment-Population Ratio has decreased 9.4% with the greatest impact on the middle-class.  During the last six years, the precipitous decline in household income significantly impacted the Black and Hispanic communities that were especially hard-hit during the Great Recession, largely due to the mortgage crisis and the erosion of middle-class jobs.  As shown above, over the last three years, the Employment-Population Ratio has flatlined, causing considerable anxiety and discord regarding limited income opportunity.

 Unemployment Rate

Since the Great Recession, unemployment increased for all Americans, but the Black and Hispanic groups were hit the worst, with current unemployment rates[8] at 13.8% for Blacks and 9.6% for Hispanics, compared to 6.8% for Whites and 5.1% for Asians (not shown on chart due to limited historical data).

Youth unemployment is even more egregious, especially for Black youths aged 16 to 19 years old, which is 38.2% compared to 20.5% for Whites[9].

In summary, Jobenomics concludes that, institutionally, minority groups are not having a major issue with participation.  The Asian minority group is doing quite well exceeding White participation in top paying occupations.  While Black and Hispanic groups lag behind Whites in participation, they are not lagging by a great extent.  On the other hand, Blacks and Hispanics are challenged by their concentration in lower labor categories, high unemployment rates and depressed household incomes.

Minority-Owned Businesses.   From a Jobenomics perspective, the primary solution to enhancing minority labor force participation and increasing wealth in minority communities involves minority-owned business creation, which is growing at twice the rate of all US business.  If America exploits this trend, millions of minority-owned businesses could be created providing many millions of jobs.

U.S. Census Bureau performs a Survey of Business Owners twice each decade.  A survey was conducted in 2007 and the results released in 2011—the latest data available.  A survey was conducted in 2012, but the results will not be released until 2015.

Highlights of the 2007 Survey of Business Owners [10] include:

  • In 2007, more than one-fifth (21.3%) of the nation’s 27.1 million firms were minority-owned.
  • In 2007, minority-owned firms numbered 5.8 million, up from 4.0 million in 2002, an increase of 45.5%—more than double the 17.9% increase for all US businesses. Receipts of minority-owned firms increased 55.0% to $1.0 trillion over the five-year period, compared with the 32.9% increase for all businesses nationwide.
  • Of the 5.8 million minority-owned firms, 766,533 had paid employees, an increase of 21.7% from 2002. These firms employed 5.8 million people, a 24.4% increase from 2002, and their payrolls totaled $164.1 billion, an increase of 42.2%. Receipts of minority-owned employer firms totaled $860.5 billion, an increase of 54.3% from 2002.
  • In 2007, minority firms with no paid employees (mainly self-employed businesses and partners of unincorporated businesses) numbered 5.0 million, an increase of 50.0% from 2002. These firms had receipts totaling $164.3 billion, an increase of 58.9%.
  • Black-owned businesses grew to 1.9 million firms in 2007, up 61% from 2002 – the largest increase among all minority-owned companies; and generated $135.6 billion in gross receipts, up 53% from 2002.  Black-owned firms accounted for 7.1% of all US businesses and employed 921,032 persons.
  • The number of Hispanic-owned businesses totaled 2.3 million (8.3% of all US businesses) in 2007, up 44% from 2002. Receipts for Hispanic firms increased 55% to $343.3 billion.
  • Asian-owned firms grew 41% from 2002 to 1.6 million. Asian-owned firms continue to generate the highest annual gross receipts at $510.1 billion in 2007, increasing 56% from 2002.

Jobenomics believes that doubling or tripling minority-owned businesses from 5.8 million to 11.6 million or 17.4 million is very achievable within a decade—if American communities implement viable plans that emphasize highly-scalable small, emerging and self-employed business creation.

Jobenomics Minority-Owned Business Creation Initiatives.   Over the last two years, Jobenomics met with minority leaders in dozens of cities to discuss minority-owned business, wealth creation and meaningful jobs creation.  These cities include Harlem (NY), Washington DC, Atlanta, Detroit, Chicago, Phoenix, Fort Worth, Philadelphia, San Diego, Las Vegas, Honolulu, Greensboro (NC), Wilmington (DE), Roanoke (VA), Chester (PA) and Bridgeport (CT).  What we learned was encouraging—even in the most financially depressed inner-cities.

It was encouraging to find a high degree of entrepreneurial spirit and willingness to create minority-owned business.  However, most government and community leaders have relatively little business experience, especially with start-ups and self-employed businesses.  To compensate for inexperience, they tend to look to Washington or big-business that has not produced any net new jobs in the last several decades.  Jobenomics contends that the most reliable source of guidance resides in innovators and serial-entrepreneurs.  Various governmental small business agencies and associations do an adequate job of counseling and providing grants, but have little expertise in mass-producing highly-scalable small businesses.

The Father of American Education, Horace Mann, stated that “education is the great equalizer of the conditions of men, the balance-wheel of social machinery.”  While Jobenomics agrees, the educational paradigm in yesteryear was much different than today.  The old paradigm, “get an education to get a job…get a better education to get a better job” simply does not work in today’s high-tech, slow-growth economy where middle-class jobs are increasingly outsourced overseas.  Most citizens in inner-cities need basic skills as opposed to higher education.  If 40% of college graduates have difficulty finding jobs, how can a high school dropout hope to find work?

From a Jobenomics perspective, basic skills include communication, tradecraft and business.  For inner-cities, Jobenomics focuses first on business creation.  Small businesses offer the fastest way out of poverty through employment for the unemployed.  Every city should have a community-based business generator that mass produces highly-scalable businesses.  Our second priority is tradecraft—a skill acquired through experience in a trade—with emphasis on skilled service businesses.  The third area is communications.  In a business sense, communications entails the ability to express and demonstrate one’s value-proposition.

Jobenomics Community-Based Generators (1) identify and train potential business leaders and business owners, (2) implement highly repeatable and scalable businesses with emphasis on service-providing businesses, (3) establish sources of start-up funding, recurring funding and contracts to provide a consistent source of revenue for new businesses, and (4) provide post start-up business support.

Many metropolitan areas have business incubators that are oriented to emerging high-tech and manufacturing businesses.  These incubators are often located in affluent areas or high-tech corridors.  Jobenomics offers a complementary concept that focuses on business generators that are oriented towards trade-level, service-providing businesses in economically-depressed areas.  Rather than incubating innovative business opportunities one-by-one, a business generator mass produces highly-scalable, start-up businesses.  When fully operational, the community-based generator will be capable of creating 1,000 new small businesses per year.

Jobenomics has three fledgling Jobenomics Community-Based Generator projects underway in College Park (Atlanta), Harlem (New York City) and Detroit.  Jobenomics is in the process of establishing networks of local non-profit and educational institutions to identify entrepreneurial talent.  Once identified, the Community-Based Generator will evaluate candidates via self-employment surveys (see initial self-employment survey at www.Jobenomics.com) and counseling to determine their suitability for business ownership and the type of business.

Following the evaluation phase, candidates will undergo a training, certification and implementation process.  Classes will be taught by successful small business owners and entrepreneurs with expertise in startup business implementation.   By the end of the program the clients will have:

  • An Employer Identification Number (EIN), incorporation (S-Corp, C-Corp or Limited Liability Corporation), and the essentials to run a fully functional company (accounting systems, business plans, legal/regulatory, branding/marketing/sales, financing, etc.).
  • A computer supplied with accounting, business planning and website/social networking systems.  Training will also be provided including how to obtain appropriate accounting (e.g., bookkeeping and CPA), information technology, and sales/marketing/ advertising/branding support after graduation from the center.
  • Supplementary business systems (e.g., website, social networking, bank accounts, etc.) that will facilitate the promotion of the new business.
  • Understanding on how to access government grants and investment capital.
  • A network of entrepreneurial organizations and on-going business support.

eCyclingUSA-JobenomicsJobenomics founded eCyclingUSA™ (www.ecyclingUSA.com) as part of its green-jobs initiative and a way to fund community-based business generators in metropolitan areas.  Each month, city managers give away millions of tons of whiteware (e.g., appliances) and other electronic waste (computers and televisions) that contain tens of millions of dollar’s worth of minerals (e.g., copper, aluminum, precious metals) that can be reclaimed, sold on the commodities market or used to develop local industries.  eCyclingUSA technology is in operation in 60 plants across Europe.  eCyclingUSA plans to implement 50 sites across the US and is committed to donating a minimum of 10% of its annual profits (between $1 and $3 million per year per site) to fund Jobenomics Community-Based Business Generators.


[1] US Census Bureau, Most Children Younger Than Age 1 are Minorities, 17 May 2012, http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb12-90.html

[2] US Census Bureau, 2010 Census Briefs, Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin: 2010, March 2011, Table 1.  Population by Hispanic or Latino Origin and by Race for the United States: 2000 and 2010, http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf

[3] US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Labor Force Characteristics by Race and Ethnicity 2011, Report 1036, published August 2012 and updated 6 June 2013, http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsrace2011.pdf

[4] Note: the BLS reports monthly on White, Black and Asian groups but not Hispanics. Consequently, this 2011 report provides the latest official US government “apples-to-apples” comparisons of all four groups.

[5] BLS, Median weekly earnings by race, ethnicity, and occupation, first quarter 2012, http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2012/ted_20120419_data.htm

[6] BLS, Household Data Annual Averages, Table 11, Employed persons by detailed occupation, sex, race and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, Year 2012 (retrieved 12 Sep 2013), http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat11.pdf

[7] US Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011, by Carmen DeNavas-Walt, Bernadette D. Proctor and Jessica C. Smith, http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p60-243.pdf, issued September 2012

[8] BLS, Unemployment rate by age, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, January 2008–February 2013, http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2013/ted_20130312.htm

[9] BLS, Table A-2 Employment status of the civilian population by race, sex, and age, September 2013, http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t02.htm

[10] US Census Bureau, 2007 Survey of Business Owners, http://www.census.gov/econ/sbo/

Urban Mining

Download PDF Version: Jobenomics Urban Mining 10 July 2013

10 July 2013

One of the Jobenomics strategic initiatives involves urban mining.  Urban mining is defined as a process of reclaiming raw materials from products, buildings and waste from towns, cities and metropolitan areas.  The goal of urban mining is to monetize urban waste streams including construction & demolition material (C&D), municipal solid waste (MSW), electronic waste (appliances, commuters/peripherals, and other electronic items) and tires (car, truck and rubber products).  Every community in America should look to urban mining to (1) recover (waste-to-materials) or convert (waste-to-energy) their waste streams, (2) reduce landfilling and exporting of raw materials, and (3) creating new businesses and jobs.

Urban Mining

The goal of urban mining is to monetize urban waste streams.  These waste streams contain combustible and non-combustible materials.  Combustibles are those items that have caloric value that can be converted to electrical power via waste-to-energy systems.  Non-combustibles, such as items containing metals, can be decomposed to retrieve raw materials via waste-to-materials processes.

Waste-to-Energy.  Jobenomics is working with several waste-to-energy companies to monetize waste streams by converting MSW and C&D material to electrical power.  Waste-to-energy systems can use incineration, pyrolysis, plasma or gasification processes.  Incineration (burning) is oldest and most common process, but is generally considered the dirtiest.   Pyrolysis burns waste material in an oxygen-free environment and produces carbon black, a material used in paints and toner cartridges, oil/tar and synthetic gas.   Pyrolysis is becoming increasingly popular but produces lots of ash and is expensive.   Plasma, which is essentially lightning in a bottle, is the most modern but yet unproven.  Due to plasma’s ultra-high temperatures (2000°C), plasma is ideally suited for eliminating toxic and nuclear waste.  Gasification is in use in 10 countries and is considered to be the cleanest and most cost effective waste-to-energy system that produces synthetic gas from organic materials.

Waste-to-Materials.  Jobenomics calculates that a waste-to-materials program can produce over $30 million worth of annual profits for a small to medium sized city.  Unfortunately, most city managers do not realize that they forego this source of revenue by landfilling or exporting items that contain high value raw materials, such as those contained in electronic waste and scrap tires.

Jobenomics defines electronic waste as IT-related e-waste, whiteware and brownware.

  • IT-Related E-Waste.  IT-related e-waste is the fastest growing municipal waste stream in the US.  The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines e-waste as computers and assorted peripherals, hardcopy devices (printers, fax machines, etc.), televisions and mobile devices—not including whiteware or brownware.  The latest EPA e-waste report[1] states that, in 2009, 2.37 million tons of IT-related e-waste was ready for end of life management with 5 million tons in storage.  The EPA calculates that 75% went to landfills and 25% was recycled.   Of the amount recycled, EPA estimated that 80% was shipped to foreign countries (mainly China, India and Nigeria) where the extraction process is unregulated and often unsafe. The EPA reports that IT-related e-waste grew by 120% from 1999 to 2009 and will continue to grow at or exceeding this rate with advent of mobile computing devices replacing desktop and laptop computers and flat panel TVs replacing TVs with cathode ray tubes (CRTs).
  • Whiteware.  The EPA also reports[2] that approximately 16 million refrigerators, air conditioners and dehumidifiers are disposed of each year.  In 2009, the EPA[3] estimates 3.7 million tons of major appliances were discarded in the municipal solid waste stream.  These appliances need special handling due to the ozone-depleting refrigerants and foam blowing agents they contain.   In addition to appliances that contain refrigerants, the US disposes an untold amount of other whiteware including 8 million vending machines and tens of millions of stoves, dishwashers, HVAC systems, water heaters, ducting, wiring and light fixtures.  National disasters, like hurricanes and tornados, produce vast stockpiles of whiteware from destroyed homes and businesses.
  • Brownware.  In 2009, the EPA[4] estimates that Municipal Solid Waste streams contained 20.4 million tons of miscellaneous durable goods (consumer electronics such as television sets, videocassette recorders, and personal computers; luggage; sporting equipment, etc.).   The EPA does not report on brownware that includes discarded items like radios, telephones, stereo equipment and components, space heaters, microwave ovens, minor kitchen and home appliances (toasters, mixers, vacuum cleaners, etc.), power and electronic garden tools, lamps and lighting equipment, toner cartridges, CDs/DVDs, and personal electronic devices (such as, hair dryers, headsets, etc.).   Throughout Europe, it is not uncommon to see collection boxes for brownware as the one shown in the picture below.  It is estimated that tens of millions of tons of brownware are routinely discarded in garbage cans and buried in landfills as part of the municipal solid waste stream.

European E-Waste Collection Bin

  • Scrap Tires.  In addition to electronic waste, the USA discards approximately 300 million scrap tires per year.   Primary scrap tire markets include: tire-derived fuel, civil engineering, and ground rubber/rubberized asphalt applications.  In the US, the primary means of disposal of scrap tires is tire-derive fuel due to their high heating value.  The typical selling price for tire-derived fuel is approximately $50/ton.  Pyrolysis of waste tires generates combustible gases, oil, and char products.  Cryogenics processes (in use in Europe) produce fine rubber powders that can sell for as much as $8,000/ton.

America is decades behind Europe in terms of recycling electronic waste (IT-related e-waste, whiteware and brownware).   Germany and France uses technology to sort, process, shred, segregate and sell raw materials generated by the decomposition of electronic waste.  This is not only economically sound but significantly reduces the need for landfilling.  As stated earlier, Americans only recycle about 5% of annually produced e-waste not including whiteware and brownware, or the vast quantities in storage and landfills.  However, America environment concerns are changing and 25 states have moratoriums on placing electronic waste in landfills.  These moratoriums have led to increased exporting as well as domestic recycling.  In addition, the number of US landfills have decreased from 7,924 in 1988 to 1,908 in 2009[1]—a decrease of 76% in two decades.

Regarding exporting, over the last year, Jobenomics has met with dozens of US city managers regarding the disposition of electronic waste, landfill conversion and urban mining.  Virtually all of the city managers (mayors, city councils, solid waste managers) were unaware that they were foregoing such a lucrative source of revenue and were very interested in how Europeans were monetizing their waste streams.   They were also unaware that most of their policies and procedures encouraged exporting electronic waste overseas as opposed to domestic recycling.   For example, many government solid waste managers acknowledge that they work with companies whose sole purpose is to identify high-value electronic waste items (computers, refrigerators) for shipment to China.  These companies would buy high-value items for pennies on the dollar and use the empty 40 foot containers that the Chinese use to ship their exports to the US to export our high-value materials back to China.  The non-high-value items were discarded in local landfills paid by taxpayers.

Regarding domestic recycling, despite the rhetoric, America is in the infancy of recycling compared to Europe.   Of the 3,000+ American recycling companies, the vast majority (99%) use manual processes to strip out the highest value materials, like copper, and discard the remaining materials in landfills.  Jobenomics estimates that less than 100 recycling companies use advanced processes to de-manufacture or shred electronic waste to obtain raw materials.  Most of these companies are niche recyclers that focus on high-value items like cell phones and computer mother boards.  Perhaps the leading US recycler is Electronics Recycling International (ERI) that processes over 80,000 tons annually in seven states with collection facilities in all 50 states.   ERI’s CEO is credited with creating the term “urban mining”.

Jobenomics believes that companies like ERI are essential to processing the tens of millions of tons of US electronic waste that is increasing every year.  Considering the advent of cloud and mobile computing as well as flat panel TVs, this trend will likely continue into the foreseeable future.  Since ERI only processes only 3% of the narrowly defined e-waste market, hundreds more companies like ERI will be needed to process the entirety of the electronics waste stream that is produced annually plus the amount in storage (homes, businesses and warehouses) and landfills (both sequestered above ground and buried beneath).   In order to meet this massive environmental challenge, Jobenomics also endorses the European model of locally owned and operated micro-processing facilities.

Jobenomics visited European electronic waste processing plants in Germany, France and Poland.  As a result of these visits, Jobenomics created a company, called eCyclingUSA (www.eCyclingUSA.com) that is partnered with the leading European manufacturer (CHEMA Environment GmbH, a division of SYSTEC, Germany) of state-of-the-art urban mining systems:  MSW sorters, Single Stream Recycling Systems, Electronic Waste Recycling and Rubber Tire Recycling systems.  SYSTEC currently designs turnkey plants in use in 60 facilities throughout Europe that produce an annual profit of approximately $30 million per year for their respective communities.

eCyclingUSA

There are no comparable US plants that shred IT-related e-waste, whiteware and brownware, and separates the raw materials (copper, aluminum, iron, plastics) in minutes into pellet form.

 EcyclingUSA Process

These pellets/powders are aggregated by raw material type and packaged for sale to commodity buyers. Our processes are accomplished in a closed environment to prevent any leakage, like CFCs, into the environment.

eCyclingUSA signed its first US contract for a 10 ton/hour whiteware, eWaste, whiteware and brownware processing facility in College Park, Georgia, a suburb in the Atlanta metropolitan area.  eCyclingUSA is also in negotiation with five other communities and in discussion with two dozen more communities as shown below. Future eCyclingUSA Site Locations

The Jobenomics/eCyclingUSA goal is to implement 50 to 100 electronic waste facilities in the USA by year 2020.  In addition, eCyclingUSA has a cryogenic process for producing fine rubber products from scrap tires.  Our scrap tire technology will be offered as add-on to the electronic waste facilities.

eCyclingUSA pledges to donate a minimum of 10% of its annual profits to a Jobenomics Business Generator that will mass produce small business in the local community.

In conclusion, every community in America should look to urban mining to (1) recover (waste-to-materials) or convert (waste-to-energy) their waste streams, (2) reduce landfilling and exporting of raw materials, and (3) creating new businesses and jobs.


[1] EPA, Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2009 Facts and Figures, Figure ES-5. Number of Landfills in the United States, 1988 – 2009, Page 15, http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw2009rpt.pdf

 


[1] US Environment Protection Agency, Electronics Waste Management in the United states Through 2009, published May 2011, http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/materials/ecycling/docs/summarybaselinereport2011.pdf

[2] US Environment Protection Agency, Disposing of Appliances Responsibly, http://www.epa.gov/ozone/partnerships/rad/raddisposal_factsheet.html

[3] EPA, Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2009 Facts and Figures, Table 12, Page 72, http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw2009rpt.pdf

[4] EPA, Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2009 Facts and Figures, Table 12, Page 72, http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw2009rpt.pdf

  • eScrap
  • Scrap Tires.  In addition to electronic waste, the USA discards approximately 300 million scrap tires per year.   Primary scrap tire markets include: tire-derived fuel, civil engineering, and ground rubber/rubberized asphalt applications.  In the US, the primary means of disposal of scrap tires is tire-derive fuel due to their high heating value.  The typical selling price for tire-derived fuel is approximately $50/ton Pyrolysis of waste tires generates combustible gases, oil, and char products.  Cryogenics processes (in use in Europe) produce fine rubber powders that can sell for as much as $8,000/ton.

America is decades behind Europe in terms of recycling electronic waste (eWaste, whiteware and brownware).   Germany and France uses technology to sort, process, shred, segregate and sell raw materials generated by the decomposition of electronic waste.  This is not only economically sound but significantly reduces the need for landfilling.  As stated earlier, Americans only recycle about 5% of annually produced eWaste not including whiteware and brownware, or the vast quantities in storage and landfills.  However, America environment concerns are changing and 25 states have moratoriums on placing electronic waste in landfills.  These moratoriums have led to increased exporting as well as domestic recycling.  In addition, the number of US landfills have decreased from 7,924 in 1988 to 1,908 in 2009[5]—a decrease of 76% in two decades.

Regarding exporting, over the last year, Jobenomics has met with dozens of US city managers regarding the disposition of electronic waste, landfill conversion and urban mining.  Virtually all of the city managers (mayors, city councils, solid waste managers) were unaware that they were foregoing such a lucrative source of revenue and were very interested in how Europeans were monetizing their waste streams.   They were also unaware that most of their policies and procedures encouraged exporting electronic waste overseas as opposed to domestic recycling.   For example, many government solid waste managers acknowledge that they work with companies whose sole purpose is to identify high-value electronic waste items (computers, refrigerators) for shipment to China.  These companies would buy high-value items for pennies on the dollar and use the empty 40 foot containers that the Chinese use to ship their exports to the US to export our high-value materials back to China.  The non-high-value items were discarded in local landfills paid by taxpayers.

Regarding domestic recycling, despite the rhetoric, America is in the infancy of recycling compared to Europe.   Of the 3,000+ American recycling companies, the vast majority (99%) use manual processes to strip out the highest value materials, like copper, and discard the remaining materials in landfills.  Jobenomics estimates that less than 100 recycling companies use advanced processes to de-manufacture or shred electronic waste to obtain raw materials.  Most of these companies are niche recyclers that focus on high-value items like cell phones and computer mother boards.  Perhaps the leading US recycler is Electronics Recycling International (ERI) that processes over 80,000 tons annually in seven states with collection facilities in all 50 states.   ERI’s CEO is credited with creating the term “urban mining”.

Jobenomics believes that companies like ERI are essential to processing the tens of millions of tons of US electronic waste that is increasing every year.  Considering the advent of cloud and mobile computing as well as flat panel TVs, this trend will likely continue into the foreseeable future.  Since ERI only processes only 3% of the narrowly defined eWaste market, hundreds more companies like ERI will be needed to process the entirety of the electronics waste stream (eWaste, whiteware and brownware) that is produced annually plus the amount in storage (homes, businesses and warehouses) and landfills (both sequestered above ground and buried beneath).   In order to meet this massive environmental challenge, Jobenomics also endorses the European model of locally owned and operated micro-processing facilities.

Jobenomics visited European electronic waste processing plants in Germany, France and Poland.  As a result of these visits, Jobenomics created a company, called eCyclingUSA (www.eCyclingUSA.com), that is partnered with the leading European manufacturer (CHEMA Environment GmbH, a division of SYSTEC, Germany) of state-of-the-art urban mining systems:  MSW sorters, Single Stream Recycling Systems, Electronic Waste Recycling and Rubber Tire Recycling systems.  SYSTEC currently designs turnkey plants in use in 60 facilities throughout Europe that produce an annual profit of approximately $30 million per year for their respective communities.

eCyclingUSA

There are no comparable US plants that shred eWaste, whiteware and brownware, and separates the raw materials (copper, aluminum, iron, plastics) in minutes into pellet form.

 Process

These pellets/powders are aggregated by raw material type and packaged for sale to commodity buyers. Our processes are accomplished in a closed environment to prevent any leakage, like CFCs, into the environment.

eCyclingUSA signed its first US contract for a 10 ton/hour whiteware, eWaste, whiteware and brownware processing facility in College Park, Georgia, a suburb in the Atlanta metropolitan area.  eCyclingUSA is also in negotiation with five other communities and in discussion with two dozen more communities as shown below.

eCyclingUSA Site Locations

The Jobenomics/eCyclingUSA goal is to implement 50 to 100 electronic waste facilities in the USA by year 2020.  In addition, eCyclingUSA has a cryogenic process for producing fine rubber products from scrap tires.  Our scrap tire technology will be offered as add-on to the electronic waste facilities.

eCyclingUSA pledges to donate a minimum of 10% of its annual profits to a Jobenomics Business Generator that will mass produce small business in the local community.

In conclusion, every community in America should look to urban mining to (1) recover (waste-to-materials) or convert (waste-to-energy) their waste streams, (2) reduce landfilling and exporting of raw materials, and (3) creating new businesses and jobs.



[1] US Environment Protection Agency, Electronics Waste Management in the United states Through 2009, published May 2011, http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/materials/ecycling/docs/summarybaselinereport2011.pdf

[2] US Environment Protection Agency, Disposing of Appliances Responsibly, http://www.epa.gov/ozone/partnerships/rad/raddisposal_factsheet.html

[3] EPA, Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2009 Facts and Figures, Table 12, Page 72, http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw2009rpt.pdf

[4] EPA, Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2009 Facts and Figures, Table 12, Page 72, http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw2009rpt.pdf

[5] EPA, Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2009 Facts and Figures, Figure ES-5. Number of Landfills in the United States, 1988 – 2009, Page 15, http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/pubs/msw2009rpt.pdf

Is America In Decline?

Thirty years ago, America was the largest creditor nation on earth.  Today, we are the largest debtor nation.  Looking to the future, when one calculates up-economics scenarios against down-economic scenarios, down scenarios dominate by a wide margin.  Consequently, it is safe to say that America is in economic decline.  The question that we should be asking is America’s decline reversible?  To answer this question, America needs to be brutally honest.  Political cheerleading and false bravado is not useful.  False hope is no hope.  From a Jobenomics perspective, hope starts in the heart.  The heart of America resides in its citizens – rich, middle-class and poor.  We can prosper only when our collective hope exceeds our collective fear.  There is much to make us afraid and there is equally as much to make us hopeful.  America’s hope resides not in our economy, but in our spirit.  The spirit of the American dream is bruised but alive.  To ensure the America dream stays alive for the financially downtrodden, it is paramount that we nurture and exploit the spirit of innovators and entrepreneurs with emphasis on those at the base of our economic pyramid.  Our economic base has to be rock solid – a house built on sand will not stand.

Today’s path to prosperity cannot be achieved through incremental changes to the status quo.  Nor can prosperity be achieved by top-down solutions.  While reduced bureaucracy, less regulation, and better financing to the base of America’s economic pyramid will help, these measures alone will not lead us to prosperity.  The path to prosperity resides mainly in our citizenry and our collective resolve to generate viable opportunities for all to achieve their American dream.  A nation divided against itself cannot stand.  This was true when Abraham Lincoln said it.  It is true today.

Over the last thirty years, America lost its focus on economic fundamentals.  $50 trillion of public and private debt caused by lavishing spending is only a symptom of a larger issue.  The American economic engine stalled because we turned from producing to speculating at all levels of or society – Main Street, Wall Street and Washington.

There is an old adage that states there are three ways to make money: (1) by your own hands, (2) by someone else’s hands, and (3) by making money-on-money.  Over the last three decades, making money-on-money became the first choice of Americans from Wall Street to Main Street to Washington.  Wall Street over-leveraged exotic financial instruments.  America’s largest corporations now make as much money on financial services as they do manufacturing.   Main Street over-extended itself by buying oversized homes, investing in the stock markets and 401Ks, and maxing out credit.  Washington not only let this happen, but became the largest trader of toxic financial instruments (mortgage-backed securities) on the global secondary market.

The path to economic security begins by changing America’s negative attitude towards business.  At best, Americans have become ambivalent towards business.  Business is taken for granted.  It is often looked upon as a necessary evil, checkbook, or social service provider, as opposed to the economic solution.  Anti-business sentiment causes big businesses to be cautious, limit hiring, close operations, and outsource overseas.  It is estimated that 25 million American jobs have been outsourced to China in recent years.   When iconic American companies, like Apple, employ more Chinese than Americans, there is a problem. Anti-business sentiment encourages small business to go out of business, layoff employees, and defer expansion.  Equally important, anti-business sentiment discourages business investment which is needed to start new businesses and grow existing businesses.

The only meaningful way to fix the American economy involves a comprehensive plan involving economics of business, job, wealth and tax revenue creation—the Jobenomics credo.  The Jobenomics Plan for America emphasizes small, emerging and self-employed businesses.  Small business is the US economic backbone.    Small business (less than 500 employees) employs 84% of the total US civilian labor force.  There are 6 million US small businesses and 22 million self employed businesses.  Since the beginning of this decade (2010s), small business generated 97% of all new jobs compared to large businesses that have produced only 3%.  Small business produces $6 trillion annual revenues, which equates to the second largest economy in the world.

If America wants to reverse its economic decline, small, emerging and self-employed businesses will have to take the lead role.  In this regard, the Jobenomics’ Team has instituted a dozen highly-scalable “proof-of-concept” business creation initiatives that can generate tens of thousands of new small, emerging and self-employed US businesses.  Current Jobenomics initiatives involve: community-based business generators, women-owned businesses initiative, veterans-owned businesses, a nation-wide system of electronic-waste recycling plants, energy and green job programs, cloud computing projects, direct-care centers, business ministries, real estate owned properties programs, minerals exploration and mining projects, a direct sales initiative, and foreign-owned US businesses and investment projects.  While most of these initiatives are in the planning phase, public response has been overwhelmingly enthusiastic.  The basis for the public’s enthusiasm resides more in the potential as opposed to the initiatives themselves.   If several hundred members of the Jobenomics team can implement businesses that could scale to tens of thousands of jobs, what could America do writ-large with a national level program?

America’s focus has to be on private sector business innovators and entrepreneurs.   The Jobenomics 20 by 20 Plan calls for small and emerging business innovators to generate 18 of the 20 million new jobs required for economic recovery by year 2020.   On a level playing field, small businesses can operate internationally.  In the near term, America needs to focus on business creation in the service-providing industries as opposed to the goods-producing industries (predominantly manufacturing, construction).  Why?  Because 78% of all American jobs are services-related, and service industry jobs can be implemented much faster than other industries.  Rapid implementation is essential to enhancing consumer and investor confidence.

America has faced many historical crossroads and has repeatedly chosen the path to prosperity.   Several hundred years ago, the vast majority of Americans worked on the farm.  Today, only one percent works in agriculture or ranching.  Over the last hundred years, the vast majority of Americans lived in rural areas.  Today, eighty percent live in urban areas.   Fifty years ago, half of our citizens worked in factories.  Today, eight percent of our workforce is employed in manufacturing.  America now faces yet another crossroad.  One path leads to continued decline.  The other path leads to renewed prosperity.  Big government, big business and top-down strategies are essential to a strong economy.  However, small business has been, and will be, the engine of economic and social transformation.  With the decline in manufacturing, construction and government funding, urban areas are struggling to support jobless masses.  Empowered by 21st Century technology and public support, small business has the wherewithal to employ tens of millions, create wealth and transform our nation.

Transformation will be lead not only by traditional innovators and entrepreneurs, but by non-traditional Generation X’ers and Generation Y’ers who are the most qualified people to monetize the internet and social networks.  Facebook alone has 800 million users.  The country that learns how to monetize social networks will be transformed almost overnight.   Tens of millions of new businesses (mostly small and self-employed) will be created.  Millions could migrate from urban to rural or virtual communities, and create a new American way-of-life to fulfill a different American dream based more on self-sufficiency and economic independence than wealth creation.  70 million Generation Y’ers are now entering the workforce.  They are tech-savvy, team-oriented and socially conscious.  They have a much different view of corporate culture and how to do business.  Most importantly, they own the future.

America’s future depends on sustainable, environmentally-friendly communities that will be more rural/virtual than urban.  Self-employed, home-based business could be the norm.  Today, there are 22 million self-employed, home-based businesses.  Tomorrow, it could be two or three times as many.  To empower growth of highly-networked small businesses, a national broadband system is essential.  From a Jobenomics perspective, building a national broadband system is the most important thing that government and big business can do for jobs creation.  Today, 40% of American households have no broadband or high-speed access and 30% have no internet access at all—mostly in rural areas.  While America has the largest total number of broadband subscribers, internationally the US ranks 15th per capita when adjusting for population size.  A state-of-the-art national broadband system is tomorrow’s business superhighway.  Just as the railroads opened the American West to commerce and Eisenhower’s interstate highway system facilitated explosive economic growth, a national broadband system will enable e-commerce and e-business between billions of people and organizations across the planet.

In conclusion, the highest percentage way to reverse America’s economic decline is to focus on business creation with emphasis on small, emerging and self-employed businesses.   Jobenomics Community-Based Business Generator projects, like Jobenomics-Harlem, are designed to create 1,000 new small businesses per year per city.  The Jobenomics Women-Owned Business initiative estimates that up to 7,000 new, predominantly home-based self-employed businesses could be created by the end of the decade.  And, these are only two of the twelve proof-of-concept initiatives that the Jobenomics team is trying to implement.  If America would implement a national small business initiative with initiatives of this nature, we could have an excellent shot at reversing our economic decline.  It all starts with an achievable vision.  President Kennedy focused American science and technology on getting to the moon in a decade.  In comparison, the Jobenomics 20 million new private sector jobs by year 2020 (20 by 20) goal should be very achievable.

Jobenomics Veterans Center(s)

The Jobenomics Veterans Center (JVC) Initiative is designed to help wounded and combat veterans transition to the civilian workforce by providing training and financing to start their own Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) or Veterans Owned Small Business (VOSB) oriented to the skills that the vet learned during his/her tenure in the US Armed Services.

While publicly venerated for patriotism and service, veterans have a much harder time finding work than most citizens. Veteran unemployment rates have been consistently higher than average citizens.   While the job market is slowly improving for most Americans, it’s moving in the opposite direction for Iraq/Afghan vets.  Veterans, aged 18 to 24, have a 30% jobless rate, up from 18% a year earlier. For for black veterans, aged 18 to 24, the unemployment rate is approching 50%.   Returning combat veterans need a “hand-up” more than they need a “hand-out”.  More specifically, they need jobs, which are in short supply in today’s economy.  Combat veterans face even a more difficult challenge after being in austere conditions, many of whom face degrees of post dramatic stress syndrome and other combat related disabilities.  Of the 2.2 million Iraq/Afghan vets, 624,000 (28%) have filed for some sort of disability with the Veterans Administration.

JVC will focus primary on combat veterans (soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines) returning from Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq).  The goal of this training is to help veterans transition into civilian life via a 6-month business training and creation program.  JVC is designed to provide an environment that will address the challenges of a successful transition from combat to civilian life as well as helping the vet start a SDVOSB or VOB.    Successful creation of a SDVOSB or VOB will provide veterans their own company as well as making them more competitive in getting a job at an established company, whether on a full-time (W2) or a part-time (1099) basis.  Having their own company will also build confidence in their ability to function in the civilian workforce and greatly shorten the transition time from combat to workfare.  While accolades from the American public are extremely gratifying, providing meaningful employment opportunities are the highest form of appreciation for their service and sacrifices.

Via the Jobenomics movement, JVC has agreements with leading entrepreneurial, business development, academic, financial and veteran experts and networks.  JVC will use proven professionals, human resources personnel and college and vocational placement specialists to aid in the transition from military to civilian life.  JVC features wellness programs, social events, excursions and motivational speakers. By the end of the 6-month program the vets will have:

  • A thorough knowledge of business practices on how to set up and run a successful small business taught by successful entrepreneurs and leading instructors with expertise in small business creation and implementation.
  • An established SDVOSB or VOB with:
    • An Employer Identification Number (EIN), incorporation (S-Corp, C-Corp or Limited Liability Corporation), and the essentials to run a fully operating company (accounting systems, business plans, legal/regulatory, branding/marketing/sales, financing, etc.).
    • All vets will be supplied a computer with accounting, business planning and website/social networking systems.  Training will be also provided including how to obtain appropriate accounting (e.g., book keeping and CPA), information technology, and sales/marketing/ advertizing/branding support after graduation.
    • All registration/licensing completed in the state and municipality of their choosing.
    • Supplementary business systems (e.g., website, social networking, bank accounts, etc.) that will facilitate the promotion of SDVOSB or VOB growth.
    • Supplementary education while at the JVC, including.
      • Enrollment in an on-line learning course on other on-line universities to pursue continuing education and certification, which will be initiated and taught by qualified instructors while at the Center.
      • Access to micro-business coaching and micro-business financing from private sector sources during and after training at the Center.
      • A JVC certificate of completion from and any supplementary certifications from the academic organizations affiliated with the Center.
      • Potential classes with local accredited academic institutions.
  • Understanding on how to access US government grants, veterans set-aside funding and investment capital (debt and equity financing) from private sources (commercial banks, investment banks, and high net worth individuals/angel investors).  Jobenomics is in the process of setting up micro-business loans for the JVC similar to the $20 million micro-business loan program (loans ranging to $50,000 for qualified new businesses) that was initiated for the Jobenomics-Harlem program.  The Center will also work with municipal, state and the federal government to underwrite the new SDVOSB/VOBs.
  • Low cost business incubation facilities and/or offices at local industrial/business parks.
  • A network of entrepreneurial organizations and an on-going business support network.

The JVC, via the national Jobenomics team of entrepreneurs and faculty, has world-class instructors, small business entrepreneurs and big business leaders.  These instructors, entrepreneurs, business leaders are from prestigious academic, entrepreneurial networks (like the 20 year old CEO Space entrepreneurial network with a world-class faculty and a network of hundreds of thousands of small business leaders across the US) and Fortune 500 executives who are willing to volunteer to help returning combat veterans.  The leading aerospace and defense corporations have expressed an interest in working with the JVC to outsource work to these newly created SDVOSB or VOB.

JVC pilot projects are currently being targeted for locations in Massachusetts, Texas and Nevada.

 

Jobenomics Women-Owned Businesses Initiative

From a Jobenomics perspective, women are the greatest untapped asset in
America.  The women-owned business initiative is paramount in the Jobenomics 20 million new private sector jobs by the year 2020 campaign (20 by 20).

Jobenomics’ emphasis is on women-owned businesses, as opposed to women-in-business.  The US has approximately 18,000 big businesses, 6 million small businesses, and 22 million self-employed businesses.  While there is nothing wrong with women pursuing opportunities in big business, Jobenomics believes that most women will find greater opportunity and satisfaction by creating their own small, self-employed business, tailored to their individual lifestyles. In comparison, today’s highly competitive corporate workspace tends to require employees to conform to corporate culture, which can conflict with other roles women may juggle, such as caring for children or aging parents.

The 2010’s is certain to be the Decade of Women-owned businesses. (1) The Great Recession has encouraged many women to join the workforce, due to necessity or desire, of which many are college educated. (2) Male-dominated industries, like construction and manufacturing, aren’t likely to return to normal until the end of the decade. (3) Social norms are changing, allowing greater participation of women in business. (4) Many of the future service-related jobs, like elder-care, are likely to be dominated by women. (5) Women-owned businesses emphasize small businesses, rather than large, and are more likely to experience growth in the next decade. (6) The traditional “nuclear” families, with a male-head of household, have given way to households headed by women. (7) Most importantly, the rate of employment growth and revenue of women-owned businesses has outpaced the economy and male-dominated businesses for the last three decades.

Today, there are approximately 10 million women-owned businesses that employ 23 million direct and indirect employees, or 22% of the US private sector civilian workforce.  9 million women-owned firms are self-employed businesses without employees.  If each women-owned business hires one additional person this decade, 10 million new jobs would be produced.  This would equate to 10 million direct jobs—half the 20 by 20 goal.  The jobenomics effort intends to help create the conditions that will motivate and incentivize growth of women-owned firms.

Jobenomics is working with several leading women’s organizations (Women’s Information Network, Women’s Radio, and California Leading Ladies) to help define women-owned business initiatives in areas like direct-selling, direct-care, cloud computing, and women veterans’ small businesses.  The Jobenomics Community-Based Business Generators will feature a number of programs that will facilitate creation of women-owned businesses.

The Women’s Information Network: http://thewinonline.com

Women’s Radio:  http://www.womensradio.com

California Leading Ladies: http://www.leadingladiesconference.com & www.EventComplete.com

 

Jobenomics Institute

The Jobenomics Institute is an initiative to establish American business incubators and business generators that will enable the creation of millions of new small, emerging and self-employed businesses.  Business incubators are designed to “incubate” individual entrepreneurial-based businesses from a host of possible opportunities.  Business generators are designed to “mass produce” businesses in high growth industry sectors.  The Jobenomics team is currently negotiating with several locations for the Jobenomics Institute that could host the following functions:

Jobenomics Center for Industrial Development (JCID) is a business training center and industrial incubator dedicated to foreign industrial development in the United States with emphasis on Asian economies, like China.  JCID’s main functions include a Foreign Executive Program and The College Preparatory School & Admissions Program for the children of foreign executives.

  • Foreign Executive Program focuses on foreign professionals who are interested in starting businesses in the United States.  The program will feature a School of Entrepreneurialism, motivational speakers from CEO and entrepreneurial communities, and meetings with business owners.  By the end of the program, the graduate will have all the skills, certifications/registrations/licenses, business systems to start a business in the United States.
  • The College Preparatory School & Admissions Program will help the children of foreign executives to prepare, visit and apply for entry into major US undergraduate programs.    Thousands of students come annually to US colleges and universities.  The College Preparatory School & Admissions Program will provide instruction on the English language and idioms, American culture, and the US higher educational landscape.  The program will include visits to leading US universities as well as assistance for college admission.
  • EB-5 Foreign Investor Program.  The Bureau of US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) administers the EB-5 Investor Program, created by Congress to stimulate the US economy through job creation and capital investment by foreign investors. Foreign Executive and College Preparatory School Program graduates are likely to want permanent visas to conduct business or attend colleges in the US.  The Jobenomics team has worked with numerous EB-5 Regional Centers throughout the US and will create an EB-5 program for the Jobenomics Institute.

Jobenomics Veterans Center is designed to help wounded and combat veterans transition to the civilian workforce by providing training and access to financing to start their own Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses (SDVOSB) or Veterans Owned Businesses (VOB) oriented to the skills that the vet learned during his/her tenure in the US Armed Services.

CEO Space.  Jobenomics is a strategic partner with CEO Space International which is a business incubator with a thirty-year legacy of training business owners, executives and entrepreneurs in over 140 countries.  CEO Space forums are held five times per year with ten-day programs ranging from 250 to 1000 people per forum.  CEO Space Forums are streamlined, professionally hosted events. Teams of professional trainers are invested in preparing each class to offer expert advice over a wide spectrum of entrepreneurial topics.

SynerVision Leadership Foundation. In a format of a nonprofit leadership excellence summit, the foundation provides cream-of-the-crop corporate trainers who teach tax-exempt organizations and NGOs the business skills they need to utilize the funds their sponsors and donors gift to them in the most cost-effective productive ways possible. This expertise is provided through world-class summits supplemented by scalable programs for individual tax-exempts that need customized value-added resources beyond what the training conferences provide.

Other Programs.  Jobenomics is currently exploring other business generator/incubator programs including local entrepreneur programs, Jobenomics boot camps, One World Expo, Direct-Sales Institute, Forum for CEOs, and Women-Owned Business Training.